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Back to Index | Relevant Policy - 10.52 Administering Medicines to Students
10.52.P.1 Administering Medicines to Students
PROCEDURE PROCEDURE
Medication Procedures
Prescription  Drugs

For occasions when it is necessary for a student to receive a prescription drug during the school day, the following procedure has been established to ensure the protection of the school and the student and to assure compliance with existing rules and procedures:

Administration by school personnel:
  • The medication must be prescribed by a physician.
     
  • The parent or guardian must provide written permission to administer the medicine to the student.  Appropriate forms are available from the school office.
     
  • The medication must come to the school office in the prescription container as put up by the pharmacist.  Written directions from the physician or pharmacist must state the name of the patient, the name of the medicine, the dosage, and the time it is to be given.
     
  • An administrator may designate a school employee to administer the medication.
     
  • Any medication administration services specified in the child's diabetes medical management plan shall be provided. 
     
  • Two (2) or more school employees, subject to final approval by the student's parent or guardian, may volunteer to serve as diabetes care assistants in an emergency as follows:. Voluntary diabetes care assistants are allowed to administer insulin, assist the pupil with self-administration of insulin, administer glucagon in an emergency situation to a pupil or perform any combination of these actions if all of the following conditions exist:
     
    • A school nurse or another health professional who is licensed pursuant to statute or a nurse practitioner who is licensed pursuant to statute is not immediately available to attend to the pupil at the time of the emergency.
       
    • If the voluntary diabetes care assistant is authorized to administer glucagon, the parent or guardian must provide to the school an unexpired glucagon kit prescribed for the student by an appropriately licensed health care professional or nurse practitioner. 
       
    • The volunteer diabetes care assistant has provided to the school a written statement signed by an appropriately licensed health professional that the voluntary diabetes care assistant has received proper training in the administration of glucagon, including the training specified in A.R.S. 15-344.01. 

    • The voluntary diabetes care assistant is authorized to administer insulin, and the parent or guardian of the pupil has provided insulin and all equipment and supplies that are necessary for insulin administration by voluntary diabetes care assistants.
       
    • The training provided by an appropriately licensed health professional must include all of the following:
       
      • An overview of all types of diabetes. 
         
      • The symptoms and treatment of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. 
         
      • Techniques for determining the proper dose of insulin in a specific situation based on instructions provided in the orders submitted by the pupil's physician. 
         
      • Techniques for recognizing the symptoms that require the administration of glucagon. 
         
      • Techniques on administering glucagon.
         
    • A District employee shall not be subject to any penalty or disciplinary action for refusing to serve as a voluntary diabetes care assistant.
       
    • The District, employees of the District, and properly licensed volunteer health professionals and nurse practitioners are immune from civil liability for the consequences of the good faith adoption and implementation of policies and procedures pursuant to District policy and this regulation.
       
  •  Each administration of prescription drugs must be documented, making a record of the student having received the medication.
     
  • Drugs must be kept in their original containers in a locked medicine cabinet.

Self-administration:
  • When the physician feels it is necessary for the student to carry and self-administer the medication, the physician shall provide written recommendations, to be attached to the signed parent permission form except in the case of medication for diagnosed anaphylaxis and breathing disorders requiring handheld inhaler devices.  In these cases, the student's name on the prescription label is sufficient for the physician's recommendation.
     
  • The student's diabetes medical management plan provided by the parent or guardian shall be signed by the appropriately licensed health professional or nurse practitioner and shall state that the student is capable of self-monitoring blood glucose and shall list the medications, monitoring equipment, and nutritional needs that are medically appropriate for the pupil to self-administer and that have been prescribed or authorized for that student. The student must be able to practice proper safety precautions for the handling and disposal of the equipment and medications that the student is authorized to use under these provisions. The pupil's diabetes medical management plan shall specify a method to dispose of equipment and medications in a manner agreed on by the parent or guardian and the school.
     
  • The parent or guardian must provide written permission for the student to self-administer and carry the medication.  Appropriate forms are available from the school office.
     
  • The medication must come in the prescription container as put up by the pharmacist.

Over-the-Counter  Medication
When it is necessary for a student to receive a medicine that does not require a prescription order but is sold, offered, promoted, and advertised to the general public, the following procedure has been established to ensure the protection of the school and the student.

Administration by school personnel:
  • Written permission must be provided by the parent or guardian for the administration of specific over-the-counter drugs.
     
  • Any over-the-counter drug or medicine sent by the parent to be administered to a student must come to the school office in the original manufacturer's packaging with all directions, dosages, compound contents, and proportions clearly marked.
     
  • An administrator may designate a school employee to administer a specific over-the-counter drug.
     
  • Each instance of administration of an over-the-counter drug must be documented in the daily log.
     
  • Over-the-counter drugs must be kept in their original containers in a locked medicine cabinet.

Self-administration:
  • Written permission must be provided by the parent or guardian for the administration of specific over-the-counter drugs by the student.
     
  • Over-the-counter drugs or medicine sent by the parent to be administered by the student must be kept by the student in the original manufacturer's packaging, with all directions, dosages, compound contents, and proportions clearly marked.
     
  • Necessity for self-administration of an over-the-counter drug or medicine shall be determined by the student's physician and must be verified by a signed physician's statement attached to the parent or guardian permission form, indicating the specific drug or medicine.

Protection  of  Students
Use or administration of medication on school premises may be disallowed or strictly limited if it is determined by the Superintendent, in consultation with medical personnel, that a threat of abuse or misuse of the medicine may pose a risk of harm to a member of the student population.

The student shall take extraordinary precautions to keep secure any medication or drug, and under no circumstances shall make available, provide, or give the item to another person.  The student shall immediately report the loss or theft of any medication brought onto school campus.  Violation of this procedure may subject the student to disciplinary action.

Emergency Administration of Epinephrine
Epinephrine auto-injectors (also known as Epi-pens or other brand names) are prescribed for specific students who have had a documented reaction to a known allergen which could result in a life-threatening emergency.  That information is provided by the parent/ doctor when the epinephrine auto-injectors is given to the health office staff.  Epinephrine auto-injectors are located in the Health Office, however, parents/guardians may request that the epinephrine auto-injectors stay with the student at all times. A parent/guardian may sign a self-carry consent form permitting the student to carry the medication.

If the student has been exposed to the known allergen, signs of impending severe anaphylaxis include:
  • Swelling of the throat, lips, tongue, or around the mouth
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • If  related to an  insect bite – there may be generalized flushing, itching, or redness of the skin
  • Increased heart rate
  • A metallic taste or itching in the mouth

Late signs include:
  • A sudden feeling of weakness
  • Abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Anxiety or an overwhelming sense of doom
  • Blue color to lips/face, not breathing
  • Collapse- UNCONSCIOUSNESS

Procedures for administration of the epinephrine are as follows:
  • Remove epinephrine auto-injector from box and plastic tube
  • Remove safety cap from the end opposite the tip where the needle will appear (has a hole in the cover)
  • Jab tip firmly into lateral aspect of the thigh so it “clicks”, hold in place for approximately 10 seconds.  This results in the cover over the needle moving back, exposing the needle, and injecting the medication.
  • Designate someone to call 9-1-1, then notify parent
  • Re-evaluate patient for worsening/ diminishing symptoms
  • Document time given on med  sheet
  • Document incident in Infinite Campus

Complete Incident Report